Tag Archives: online campaigning

4 Things You Need To Know About NationBuilder

In the political tech space, NationBuilder is a very popular platform for building around online mobilization. I have used NationBuilder on campaigns and have completed the “Certified Expert” course. So I have had a chance to explore tool and its capabilities. Because NationBuilder seems to be the “go to” platform for political and advocacy campaigns at the moment, I thought I would offer some thoughts for those who are looking at building a site using NationBuilder or incorporating it into their digital advocacy programme. Read more

Traditional Campaigning Needs Scrutiny

In many ways, traditional campaigns haven’t changed in 30 years or more. Anyone who has ever run any kind of political campaign know that there are fairly consistent pillars of contemporary campaigns: brochures, signs, print/TV/radio ads, phone banks, canvassing and (more recently) digital. As an individual who advocates for a robust digital presence, I am constantly asked to provide evidence that money spend on online campaigning will produce concrete, measurable results.

That is understandable. Politics is about managing scarcity; so it is not a surprise that those managing a campaign would want to ensure that allocated funds are spent wisely. And one of the more compelling reasons to spend on digital is because of the ability to track and test everything you do. With standard analytics you can determine – with a great degree of accuracy – what does and does not work. Read more

Get Hijacked Or Have Conversations

As we get closer to municipal elections, I see more and more candidates jumping on Twitter to start conversations – and that’s awesome. I think it’s great that candidates are finally recognizing that they need to have those conversations online and reach a broader base of voters. What’s not so awesome is when candidates create their own hashtags, for example #hardwickformayor (no, I’m not running for mayor anytime soon).

Here’s a few reasons why I would not recommend creating your own hashtag – unless of course, you’re a Twitter superstar. Hashtags are where conversations happen – positive and negative. When you create a hashtag you’re assuming people will congregate on it. Well, one of three things will happen: Read more

Be Like McDonald’s

Twitter makes it easy to communicate with others. When someone mentions you in a tweet, with a click of one button, you can reply to that individual right from your phone. Unfortunately, many elected officials and other representatives in the online political space do not take advantage of this simple feature. A perfect example of this is illustrated amongst the party leaders in the recent provincial election. Read more

Wasted Opportunity

Today is Election Day in Ontario, so it gives me a chance to assess the digital campaigns for all three of the major parties. Mark and I plan to discuss each campaign in greater detail on next week’s RootsCast, but I wanted to offer my general thoughts before the votes are cast. What I can conclude is that the 2014 provincial election was the “broadcast election”. In many ways, this election has reversed the trend we have seen over multiple contests across Canada and the United States where the online portion of the parties’ election machine took an increasingly prominent role. Read more