Tag Archives: social media

How Not To Defend Yourself Online

Long-time Mayor of Brampton Susan Fennell is in a tough campaign to be reelected. According to a poll conducted in the spring, Fennell is polling at around 18%, putting her in third place. One of the key reasons for this, observers say, is an expense controversy that has dogged Fennell for quite some time.

In response to this reality, Fennell has launched a Brampton Truths initiative, which looks to counter some of the allegations around her. The Mayor has tweeted a link to an email her team sent to the media responding to allegations. Her team has also decided to take the fight to social media, setting up a Twitter account and Facebook Page. Read more

Rethinking Hashtag Campaigns

If you have been reading this blog for any length of time, you know that I approach hashtag campaigns very cautiously, as I have talked about here and here. But recently I have started to rethink the utility of hashtag campaigns, primarily in the area of raising awareness.

There is plenty of data to support the statement that hashtags work. I wrote about some of that data here. As I noted in that post, even Twitter itself has data to show that hashtags increase engagement for both individuals and brands. As my colleague Mark pointed out last week, it makes more sense to jump on an existing hashtag than try and start your own one. Read more

Get Hijacked Or Have Conversations

As we get closer to municipal elections, I see more and more candidates jumping on Twitter to start conversations – and that’s awesome. I think it’s great that candidates are finally recognizing that they need to have those conversations online and reach a broader base of voters. What’s not so awesome is when candidates create their own hashtags, for example #hardwickformayor (no, I’m not running for mayor anytime soon).

Here’s a few reasons why I would not recommend creating your own hashtag – unless of course, you’re a Twitter superstar. Hashtags are where conversations happen – positive and negative. When you create a hashtag you’re assuming people will congregate on it. Well, one of three things will happen: Read more

Be Like McDonald’s

Twitter makes it easy to communicate with others. When someone mentions you in a tweet, with a click of one button, you can reply to that individual right from your phone. Unfortunately, many elected officials and other representatives in the online political space do not take advantage of this simple feature. A perfect example of this is illustrated amongst the party leaders in the recent provincial election. Read more

Wasted Opportunity

Today is Election Day in Ontario, so it gives me a chance to assess the digital campaigns for all three of the major parties. Mark and I plan to discuss each campaign in greater detail on next week’s RootsCast, but I wanted to offer my general thoughts before the votes are cast. What I can conclude is that the 2014 provincial election was the “broadcast election”. In many ways, this election has reversed the trend we have seen over multiple contests across Canada and the United States where the online portion of the parties’ election machine took an increasingly prominent role. Read more